Strike to Communism?

on January 29, 2021 Aktuelles, Betriebsarbeit, International, Organizing with 0 comments
Streiken bis zum Kommunismus

You also wonder why the world revolution still hasn’t happened? Why we as a revolutionary organization are behind our possibilities? And how we can potentially get out of it?
Then our two-part workshop in November and December, “Strike to Communism?” would have been for you! On two days, we discussed theoretical and practical aspects of our organizing activities based on our resolutions from the strategy conference in May 2018. We had a total of 32 registrations, of which about 20 people ended up attending.

Day 1: The Introduction into strategical Debates and Learning from Practice

On the first day, using a labor struggle story from the Canadian Postal Workers’ Union, we discussed how social analysis can be done on the basis of one’s own life and work experiences, and how successful strategies were developed from here. Subsequently, we devoted ourselves to the content-related analyses and the history of Italian operaism, which also developed along the lines of the historical IWW. Specifically, we focused on the method of militant research developed by the operaists, which we also consider in the form of our 101 and 102 organizing training as part of our practice.
To discuss this analysis further and with current examples,  comrades from the Angry Workers in West London joined us during the afternoon. With them, we talked about difficulties in organizing projects, about the role of organizations like the IWW but also about the limits and opportunities of syndicalism in general. We also addressed the topic of gendered division of labor, feminism and broader working-class strategies.

Day 2: In-depth Study and Discussion about Revolutionary Practice

The second day of the workshop was devoted to various areas of in-depth study, which we looked at using operaist methods. These included the thematic complex of feminism & gender relations, the technological attack, and the concept of the autonomy of migration. With these in-depth areas, we grasped different sides of the same applied method that informs our union practice. In this way, we wanted to show that it is possible to establish a connection between our own reality and the experiences of others. Afterward, we discussed the question of whether – although the IWW is unfortunately only successful on a low level – nevertheless our practice of (workplace) organizing, by opening spaces like Worker Centers locally and through our networking as an international organization, we help to shape revolutionary subjectivities and live germ forms for new social approaches. It is important for us to continue to educate the strands we have discussed and to advance a qualitative leap in the networking and development of our previous approaches and tools of the trade.

To this end, we did a labor struggle storytelling workshop on January 30, 10-12. These experiences will then be disseminated further and develop into a larger project over the course of the year. With this and following the “Your Job Your Union” campaign from the UK, we want to develop our organizing practice.
You also wonder why the world revolution still hasn’t happened? Why we as a revolutionary organization are behind our possibilities? And how we can potentially get out of it?
Then our two-part workshop in November and December, “Strike to Communism?” would have been something for you! Over two days, we discussed theoretical and practical aspects of our workplace and organizing work following our resolutions from the May 2018 strategy conference. We had a total of 32 registrations, of which about 20 people ended up attending.

On the first day, we discussed how social analysis can be done on the basis of one’s own life and work experiences, and how successful strategies were developed with this approach, using a labor struggle story from the Canadian Postal Workers’ Union. Subsequently, we devoted ourselves to the content-related analyses and the history of the development of Italian operaism, which also developed along the lines of the historical IWW. Specifically, we focused on the method of militant research developed by the operaists, which we also consider part of our practice in the form of our 101 and 102 organizing training.
To discuss this analysis further and with current examples, we joined comrades from the Angry Workers in West London in the afternoon. With them we talked about difficulties in organizing projects, the role of organizations like the IWW but also about the limits/opportunities/barriers of syndicalism in general, gendered division of labor, feminism and broader working class strategies.

The second day of the workshop was devoted to various areas of in-depth study, which we looked at using operaist methods. These included the thematic complex of feminism & gender relations, the technological attack, and the concept of the autonomy of migration. With these in-depth areas, we grasp different sides of the same applied method that informs our practice. In this way, we want to show that it is possible to establish a relationship between our own reality and the experiences of others, and for us to derive an anti-capitalist trade union practice from this. Afterwards we discussed the question whether we are unfortunately only successful on a low level, but nevertheless our practice of (workplace) organizing, but also by opening spaces like Worker Centers locally and through our networking as an international organization, help to shape revolutionary subjectivities and live germ forms for new social approaches. It is important for us to continue to develop the strands we have discussed further and to advance a qualitative leap in the networking and development of our previous approaches and tools.

To this end, we did a labor struggle storytelling workshop on January 30. These experiences will then be disseminated further and develop into a larger project over the course of the year. Because following the “Your Job Your Union” campaign from the UK, we want to develop our organizing practice!

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